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Corgi F4U-1D Corsair USS Bunker Hill Diorama
Corgi F4U-1D Corsair USS Bunker Hill Diorama

Limited Edition 1:72 Scale Authentic Diecast Model Diorama of the World War II F4U-1D Corsair (BuNo 57803) of Lt Cdr Roger Hedrick, VF-84, USS Bunker Hill, February 1945

Includes 1:72 Scale Aircraft, Carrier Diorama and Four Hand-Painted Metal Figures. Wingspan: 6.75" - Base measures 8 inches by 8 inches and weighs over 3 lbs.

Limited Edition Corgi Collectible Number 40 of only 1430 distributed worldwide

Lt Cdr Roger Hedrick

While Executive Officer of legendary VF-17 "Jolly Rogers" in 1943-44, Roger Hedrick claimed nine kills over Bougainville.

He later commanded VF-84 on its fateful combat cruise aboard Bunker Hill in 1944-45 and claimed three kills in this machine on 25 February 1945 over the Japanese islands, taking his final score to 12.

Hedrick later assumed command of the vessel's Air Group (CVG-84) following the death of its previous commander in action. The aircraft's distinctive yellow nose, which had been applied for CVG-84's first Tokyo raid on 19 February 1945, had been painted out by the time Hedrick claimed his last kills six days later.


F4U Corsair

By early 1943, Corsairs were being received by the eager pilots in squadrons that were being shipped to the Pacific theater. At Guadalcanal and elsewhere, these pilots began to achieve huge successes. In the hands of these Navy and Marine pilots, the Corsair racked up an impressive 11.3 to 1 air-to-air kill ratio. While this was considerably less than the 19 to 1 ratio achieved by the F6F Hellcat, it still remains one of the best ratios ever achieved by an American fighter. Clearly, the Corsair excelled in its intended mission as an air-to-air fighter. (Note: The Hellcat's ratio is the highest achieved by an American fighter aircraft in World War II.)

But as the war progressed, the Corsair's capabilities as a fighter-bomber were continually improved. With the F4U-1A, a centerline bomb rack was fitted that could carry a single bomb weighing up to 1,000 pounds. Two additional pylons were added under the center wing section on the F4U-1C and F4U-1D. During production of these two variants, the capability to carry eight 5-inch rockets under the outer wing sections was also added.

The wing-root inlets for engine air caused the Corsair’s distinctive sound, which earned it the nickname “Whistling Death”.

 
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Price: $150.00